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inductive effectZoomA-Z

Subject - Physical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry

The concept of the inductive effect developed by G. N. Lewis and Sir C. Ingold describes the influence of electropositive or electronegative substituents in organic molecules on their reactivity. The effect is caused by substituents exerting polarisation via σ bonds across the rest of the molecule. Information about the strength of the inductive effect is gained from dipole moments. In general, all inductive effects are compared to hydrogen as the standard substituent. Atoms or groups of atoms that are more electron-withdrawing than H (e.g. Cl) show an -I effect while those that are electron-donating have an +I effect.

Recommended Learning Units

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