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Subject - Organic Chemistry

Amines are substitution products of ammonia in which one to three hydrogen atoms are substituted by alkyl or aryl residues.

In primary amines, one H atom is substituted, e.g. methylamine CH3-NH2.

In secondary amines, two H atoms are substituted as in dimethylamine (CH3)2NH.

In tertiary amines, all three H atoms are replaced as in trimethylamine (CH3)3N.

On the other hand, organic compounds can have several amino groups, e.g. phenylenediamine H2N-C6H4-NH2.

Under normal conditions, methylamine, ethylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine are gases, all others are either liquids or solids. With ascending molecular weight, the smell of aliphatic amines changes from ammonia-like over fishy to odorless .

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